Patrick Ian Armstrong

Patrick Ian ArmstrongPatrick Ian Armstrong is an Associate Professor at Department of Psychology at Iowa State University. He completed his PhD in Counselling Psychology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2005.  He earned his MA in Counselling Psychology2002 from the same institution. He holds a BA in Psychology from University of Ottawa.

His primary area of research is identity development with an emphasis on factors that influence educational experiences and future aspirations and career choices.  Armstrong also conducts research on the assessment and measurement of individual differences in interests, values, personality, and ability perceptions; multicultural issues in career counselling and the perceived costs of racism; and methods of structural data analysis.

His selected publications include:

  • Rounds, J., & Armstrong, P. I. (in press). Vocational Interests. Chapter to appear in T. Chamorro-Premuzic, A. Furnham, & S. von Stumm (eds.) Handbook of Individual Differences.
  • Anthoney, S. F. & Armstrong, P. I. (2010). Individuals and Environments: Linking Ability and Skill Ratings with Interests. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 57, 36-51.
  • Armstrong, P. I., & Vogel, D. L. (2010). Theoretical and methodological issues with testing the SCCT and RIASEC models: Comment on Lent, Sheu, and Brown (2010) and Lubinski (2010). Journal of Counseling Psychology, 57, 239-247.

Credits to Iowa State University

Published: 31 March 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Craig Anderson

Craig AndersonCraig  Anderson grew up on a small family farm in northern Indiana. In his senior year he was named his high school’s Athelete of the Year and the region’s Kiwanis Club Athelete of the Year (following in his brother’s footsteps, the only siblings to have won this award). He graduated as the co-valedictorian. After graduating from high school he joined the US Army Reserve. He received his BA in psychology and sociology from Butler University in 1976. His MA in psychology from Stanford University was awarded in 1978; Lee Ross was his MA advisor. He received his PhD in psychology from Stanford University in 1980, with J. Merrill Carlsmith serving as his dissertation advisor.

Professor Anderson was an Assistant (1980-1985) and Associate (1985-1988) Professor at Rice University, and a Visiting Professor at Ohio State (1984-1985). He joined the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1988 and became Full Professor there in 1992. He has served on Faculty Councils at Rice (1987-1988) and at Missouri (1995-1996). He also served as Director of Graduate Studies for the Department of Psychology at Missouri from 1988-1996, and as Director of Graduate Admissions from 1988-1991. He was Faculty Advisor to Psi Chi (1991-1996) and to the Graduate Association of Students in Psychology (1992-1996). He also served as President, and incorporated the Stephen’s Elementary Parents’ Organization, 1994-1995.

He joined the Iowa State University faculty in 1999, as Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology. In 2004, Professor Anderson was presented with the “Iowa State University Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research.” In 2005, he was awarded the title “Distinguished Professor,” the highest faculty honour given by Iowa State University. He served six years as Department Chair, completing his term in 2005.

In 2007, he founded the Centre for the Study of Violence, and currently serves as its Director.

Anderson’s main research interests are in social and personality psychology, with a strong emphasis on cognitive psychology. Most of his current research focuses on aggression. Most of that research focuses on the potentially harmful effects of exposure to violent video games. Other aggression research under way in his lab includes work on jealousy, attribution and appraisal processes, temperature effects, and effects of violent media of various types. For example,  Anderson and his colleagues have shown that hot temperatures increase aggressive behaviour under some circumstances, in both laboratory and field settings. This research has also shown that global warming will likely produce substantial increases in violent crime. Other research has shown how life experiences influence the way people think about guns, which in turn influences the effects of weapon primes on aggressive thoughts and behaviour. Still other research has shown that men who are prone to sexual aggression against women also tend to behave more aggressively against women in non-sexual ways, and that they specifically target women rather than other men.

Credits to Iowa State University

Published: 29 March 2014

Last update: 07 March 2015

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Monica Biernat

Monica BiernatMonica Biernat is professor of Psychology at University of Kansas. She is also the Associate Chair of Research and Graduate Studies and serves as the Director of Social Programme at the university. She completed her PhD in 1989 from University of Michigan.

Biernat studies stereotyping and prejudice, and more specifically, she focuses on how stereotypes affect judgements of and behaviour displayed toward individual members of stereotyped groups (including the self). Her research on the “shifting standards model” suggests that by virtue of holding a stereotype, we use category-specific standards against which we judge members of stereotyped groups. The result is that, for example, an individual woman might be judged as more aggressive than a comparable man-a contrast effect-because she is judged relative to a lower (female) standard.

Biernat research has also suggested that perceivers set lower minimum standards but higher confirmatory standards (e.g., stringent evidentiary criteria to document ability in a domain) for members of devalued groups (women, Blacks), and that zero-sum behaviours (distribution of valued resources) tend to favour the positively stereotyped, whereas nonzero-sum behaviours favour the negatively stereotyped (e.g., the “terrific” female softball player may receive more pats on the back than a comparable male player, but nonetheless still find herself benched more often than the male). The overall theme of this research is that stereotypes guide judgements of others in subtle, complex, and sometimes contradictory ways.

Her publications include:

  • Biernat, M. (2012). Stereotypes and shifting standards: Forming, communicating and translating person impressions. In P. G. Devine & E. A. Plant (Eds.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 45 (pp. 1-59). New York: Elsevier.
  • Biernat, M., & Danaher, K. (2012). Interpreting and reacting to feedback in stereotype-relevant performance domains. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 271-276.
  • Biernat, M., & Danaher, K. (2012). Prejudice. In H. A. Tennen and J. M. Suls (Eds.), Handbook of Psychology, Volume 5: Personality and Social Psychology (pp. 340-367). New York: Wiley.

Credits to University of Kansas

Published: 28 March 2014

Last update: 21 April 2015

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Ruth Ann Atchley

Ruth Ann AtchleyRuth Ann Atchley is the Department Chair and Associate Professor of Cognitive Psychology and Clinical Psychology at University of Kansas. She completed her PhD in 1997 at University of California, Riverside. Atchley is engaged in both psychophysiological and behavioural research designed to test neurolinguistic theories of language comprehension. More specifically, her work addresses issues of word comprehension, discourse comprehension, individual differences in language processing, and verbal creativity. Clinical extensions of my research include the study of language processing in individuals with ongoing or remitted Clinical Depression and the study of adults with a history of Developmental Language Disability. She is able to use data from these patient populations as a tool for understanding the representation of phonology, semantics, and emotional information in the lexicon of the two cerebral hemispheres.

Her publications include:

  • Atchley, R.A., & Kwasny, K. (2003). Using event related potentials to examine hemispheric differences in semantic processing. Brain and Cognition, 53, 133-138.
  • Atchley, R. A., Ilardi, S. S., & Enloe, A., (2003). Hemispheric asymmetry in the lexical processing of emotion: The effect of current and past depression. Brain and Language, 84(1), 105-119
  • Atchley, R.A., Story, J., Buchanan, L., (2001). Exploring the contribution of the cerebral hemispheres to language comprehension deficits in adults with developmental language disorder. Brain and Cognition. 46,16-20.

Credits to University of Kansas

Published: 27 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Maureen Seaberg

Maureen SeabergMaureen Seaberg is an author with several forms of synesthesia and is an expert synesthesia blogger for Psychology Today. She has written for numerous publications, including the New York Times; the Daily Beast; the Huffington Post; O, the Oprah Magazine; and ESPN: The Magazine. She has appeared on MSNBC, PBS, and The Lisa Oz Show on Oprah Radio. She won a scholarship to the inaugural Norman Mailer Writers Colony in 2009 and has been accepted to Bread Loaf Writers Conference twice. A native New Yorker, she currently resides in the city.

Seaberg has presented on synesthesia at the University of Arizona’s Centre for Consciousness Studies’ Toward a Science of Consciousness TSC conferences in Tucson and in Stockholm, at the American Synesthesia Association conference at Vanderbilt University and at New York University, Yale University and at Tibet House.

She recently tested DNA positive for tetrachromacy, or the presence of a fourth cone for colour vision.

You can follow her on Twitter @SynesthesiaGal

Published: 27 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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David Johnson

David K. Johnson, assistant professor, psychology and gerontologyDavid Johnson is a licensed clinical psychologist with specialty training in Gerontology and Neuropsychology.   He is an assistant professor in Clinical Psychology at University of Kansas. Johnson has considerable multidisciplinary experience and worked closely with Geriatricians, Neurologists, Neuropathologists, Psychiatrists, Nurse Practitioners, and Biostatisticians in medical and academic settings. He also received specialty training in longitudinal data analysis as a postdoctoral fellow in Neurology at the Washington University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centre, examining white matter disease, Alzheimer’s dementia, Lewy Body disease, and dementia associated with Parkinson’s disease. He is also an adjunct faculty in Neurology at KU Medical Centre and works closely with Jeff Burns of the Brain Ageing Project and the Alzheimer Disease Centre in Kansas City.

His primary interest is in clinical research that identifies cognitive and emotional processes that characterise healthy ageing and dementia. Although some age-related change may be part of healthy ageing processes, there are certain changes in memory and cognition that are early markers of dementia pathology leading to profound intellectual decrements in individuals with dementia. His research explores neuropsychological changes in ageing and how these changes impact thinking and emotion. Johnson is motivated by a framework that suggests multiple, co-occurring factors that affect cognitive ageing. He focuses on understanding these diverse, and dissociable, brain changes in ageing and dementia and how they affect cognition and emotion.

He completed his PhD in Clinical Psychology in 2003 from Washington University of St Louis.

Credits to University of Kansas

Published: 27 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Jean McAvoy

Jean McAvoyJean McAvoy is a lecturer in psychology at Open University. Her current research interests focus on the construction, constitution and experience of subjectification and subjectivity. McAvoy works within a framework of critical social psychology. She is interested in what resources people have for making sense of their lives, how this is shaped within particular social and cultural practices. Her particular interests lie in what kinds of moralities are produced, and how concepts of rights and wrongs are established, consolidated, or challenged. She is interested in what gets accomplished at personal, interpersonal and institutional levels when concepts such as good or bad, successful or failing, legitimacy, deficiency and deviancy are applied to people and behaviour.

Methodologically, McAvoy works with a broad understanding of discourse analysis. This broad approach allows epistemological investigations of how knowledge and understanding is worked up at a local and more macro levels, and explorations of the ontology of subjectivity and relationality and the nature of interiority and experience.

Credits to Open University

Published: 26 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Jennifer Yates

Jennifer YatesJennifer Yates is an assistant professor of psychology at Ohio Wesleyan University. Yates obtained her undergraduate degree in Psychology and Biology at the University of Dayton. She completed her PhD in Neurobiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After teaching at several small Liberal Arts colleges in the Northeast, she joined the faculty of Ohio Wesleyan University in 2007.

She is interested in the mechanisms of secondary pathology after spinal cord injury. Particularly in the mechanisms of further injury that are mediated by the immune reaction to a primary spinal cord injury. She investigates the pathological processes that happen and therapeutic intervention in these processes that may spare motor, sensory, and cognitive functions after neurotrauma.

Credits to Ohio Wesleyan University and Teaching The Neurobiology of Brain Dysfunction

Published: 25 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Megan Carlos

Megan CarlosMegan Carlos is an assistant professor of psychology at Argosy University. Carlos received her MA in Child Psychology and her PhD in Child Clinical Psychology from the University of Minnesota at Twin Cities. Following the completion of her doctoral degree, she worked as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, where she provided individual, group, and family therapy to children and adolescents and taught parenting classes for caregivers of children with ADHD and autism. Before coming to Argosy University, Carlos taught courses in child and adolescent psychology, human development, and cognitive assessment at University of the Pacific and Framingham State College. Her professional and research interests include attachment theory, developmental psychopathology, and empirically-based treatment of children and adolescents.

Her publications include:

  • Carlson, E.A., Sampson, M.C., & Sroufe, L.A. (2003). Implications of attachment theory and research for developmental and behavioral pediatrics. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 24, 364-379.
  • Sroufe, L.A., & Sampson, M.C. (2000). Attachment theory and systems concepts. Human Development, 43, 321-326.

Credits to Argosy University

Published: 25 March 2014

Last update: 04 February 2015

Nancy Budwig

Nancy BudwigNancy Budwig is a professor of psychology at Clark University. Budwig received a BA from Vassar College in 1979 and a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley in 1986. She has been at Clark University since that time and is also affiliated with the programme in Communication and Culture. Budwig joined the Academic Administration in 2002 and is currently serving the university as Associate Provost and Dean of Research.

Budwig’s research examines issues of the construction of knowledge and human development. Trained in the areas of human development and the inter-disciplinary study of language, thought, and culture, Budwig examines issues of the development of knowledge and the role that participation in communities of practice plays in the gradual construction of meaning systems. Her research on language acquisition aims to understand the protracted nature of the organisation and development of linguistic forms and the functions they serve in everyday interaction. Her work on language socialisation examines ways participation in language practices contributes to the construction of culturally relevant senses of personhood. Further information about ongoing projects can be found at her personal Web page.

Her publications include:

  • Guo, J., Lieven, E., Budwig, N., Ervin-Tripp, S., Ozcaliskan, S., & Nakamura, K. (Eds.). (2008). Cross-linguistic approaches to the psychology of language: Research in the tradition of Dan Isaac Slobin. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum/Taylor and Francis.
  • Müller, U., Carpendale, J., Budwig, N., & Sokol, B. (Eds.). (2007). Social knowledge and social life: Developmental perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum/Taylor and Francis.
  • Budwig, N., Narasimhan, B., & Srivastava, S. (2006). Interim solutions: The acquisition of early verb construction in Hindi. In E. V. Clark & B. Kelly (Eds.), The acquisition of constructions. Stanford, CA: CSLI Press.

Credits to Clark University

Published: 25 March 2014

Last update: 03 April 2015

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Mark Yarhouse

Mark YarhouseMark Yarhouse is a professor of psychology at Regent University. He received his BA in Philosophy and Art from Calvin College, along with a minor in Psychology. Yarhouse knew at that time that he wanted to complete graduate studies in psychology, so he minored in that area, but he also wanted to mark his interest in art by completing a degree in that field. His primary medium was lithography, followed by watercolour painting, and pen and ink drawing. He also completed a philosophy degree because he wanted to learn how to think rigorously about topics from a Christian perspective.

Following graduation, Yarhouse worked for a year at a youth home in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and his wife and him enjoyed their first year of marriage together. They then moved to Wheaton, Illinois, where he completed his PsyD in Clinical Psychology, MA in Clinical Psychology, and MA in Theological Studies. He had the opportunity to be mentored by Stanton Jones, who was at that time the programme director and is now the provost at Wheaton. His scholarship included work on integration of psychology and theology and the topic of homosexuality.

When he graduated from Wheaton in 1998 he moved to Virginia Beach and began working in the Doctoral Programme in Clinical Psychology at Regent. He continued writing about integration and also about homosexuality. Since that time he launched the Institute for the Study of Sexual Identity (ISSI).

You can learn more about ISSI at www.sexualidentityinstitute.org and follow his work with his colleagues at www.facebook.com/ISSI.Site. There are now approximately 10 to 12 students in the doctoral programme who actively participate in ISSI. They work together in three major areas: research, training, and clinical services. The research they conduct is on sexual identity, how it develops and synthesises over time, and the attributions people make in response to their same-sex sexuality. Trainings are conducted monthly for students in ISSI. Clinical services include individual, couple, family and group therapy for people who are navigating these issues.

He currently teaches the following doctoral courses: Applied/Clinical Integration, Ethics, Integration Capstone, and Human Sexuality. I have also taught courses in Psychopathology, Family Therapy, Geropsychology and Christian Healing. His philosophy of teaching involves seeing whatever subject matter we study “through the eyes of faith.” He tends to be student-orientated, focusing on engaging students through the subject matter and its application to their professional identity and ways in which God may be at work in their lives. He also tries to call students to be good stewards of the many resources they have been given, to teach them to be advocates for those who are marginalised, and to see what they do in the context of God’s redemptive plan.

Credits to Regent University

Published: 24 March 2014

Last update: 27 February 2015

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Holly Arrow

Holly ArrowHolly Arrow is a professor of psychology at Institute of Cognitive and Decision Sciences at University of Oregon. She completed her PhD in  Psychology from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1996. Her MA in Psychology is from University of Illinois, which she earned on 1995; MFA Photography from University of Colorado, Boulder in 1982. She finished her BA Philosophy and  Artas magna cum laude at Elmira College in 1977.

Arrow has two major research interests. The first is the formation and development of small groups as complex dynamic systems.  The second is the psychology of war, in particular the evolution of social capacities that help men and women cope with the challenges to survival and reproductive success posed by war.   Topics of recent papers include gender relations in the military, the evolution of heroism,  the role of friendship in dissolving the social anxiety of outgroup interactions, sources of cohesion in groups of different sizes, and using complexity to improve the  effectiveness of groups in health care.

You can find out more about her research works here.

Her recent publications include:

  • Hannagan, R.J., & Arrow, H. (2011). Reengineering gender relations in modern militaries: An evolutionary perspective.  Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 12, 1-19.
  • Arrow, H., & Henry, K.B. (2010). Using complexity to promote group learning in health care. Journal of Evaluation of Clinical Practice, 16, 861-866.
  • Arrow, H. (2010). Cliques, coalitions, comrades, and colleagues: Sources of cohesion in groups. In R. Dunbar, C. Gamble & J. Gowlett (Eds.) Social Brain, Distributed Mind.  Proceedings of the British Academy (158), 269-281. Oxford University Press.

Credits to University of Oregon

Published: 24 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Michael Bamberg

Michael BambergMichael Bamberg is a professor of psychology at Clark University. He received a Staatsexamen in German, Politics and Education from the Universität Marburg, Germany in 1975, an MPhil in Linguistics from the University of York in 1978, and a PhD in Psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1985. He has been at Clark University since 1986.

Bamberg’s research is in the area of Discourse and Identity with an emphasis on how Narratives (particularly ‘Small Stories’) are employed as general sense-making and identity-building strategies. Methodologically, he approaches the study of identity microanalytically (microgenetically) as an emergent process that is deeply embedded in local and situated context. His research projects are in the area of adolescent and post-adolescent identity formation, particularly the emergence of professional identities.

His selected publications include:

  • Bamberg, M., De Fina, A., & Schiffrin, D. (2010). Discursive perspectives on identity construction. In S. Schwartz, K. Luyckx & V. Vignoles (Eds.), Handbook of identity theory and research. Berlin/New York: Springer Verlag.
  • Bamberg, M. (2009). Identity and narration. In P. Huehn, J. Pier, W. Schmid & J Schoenert (Eds.), Handbook of narratology. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.
  • Bamberg, M., & Marchman, V. (2009). Small stories as a new perspective in narrative and identity analysis. Text & Talk, 28(3), 377-396.

Credits to Clark University

Published: 24 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Annaliza Lagrutta

Annaliza LagruttaAnnaliza Lagrutta is an Adjunct Associate Professor at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, California, USA. Lagrutta earned her BA in psychology from San Francisco State University and worked for six years with an international Landscape Architecture firm. During that time she had the opportunity to travel and learn how psychology impacts the decision of architectural designs in our environment.  She returned to her hometown of Stockton and attended National University to earn her MA in Counselling Psychology which has always been her passion. While in her master programme, she worked with developmental disabled adults in the community. For the past 16 years Lagrutta has been Mental Health Clinician providing services to adults who are mentally disabled on an outpatient basis with San Joaquin County Behavioural Health.

She is a passionate learner and appreciate the experiences of learning new things to enhance my understanding of my field. Lagrutta is a lifelong learner who appreciates all aspects of education. She believes a good education can transform lives and positively affect our community. Her goal as an educator is to support my students in making their own unique impact on society. She believes all her students can succeed in their dreams of the future.

Credits to San Joaquin Delta College

Published: 24 March 2014

Last update: 04 April 2015

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Tania Abouezzeddine

Tania AbouezzeddineTania Abouezzeddine has studied and has experience in several areas of the field of psychology working on topics such as trauma, pediatric psychology, cross-cultural psychology and clinical neuropsychology. She is currently an associate professor of psychology at Biola University and had worked at the University of Southern California before joining Biola University. Abouezzeddine graduated from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon with a degree in psychology. She earned her master’s degree at Boston University and later her doctorate in psychology specialising in clinical science at the University of Southern California.  During her doctorate studies, Abouezzeddine studied the effects of social support from friends and family on adolescents consistently bullied in their school environment.

In addition to her work in the area of school trauma, Abouezzeddine received extensive training in the area of clinical neuropsychology working with populations across the lifespan, from pediatrics to geriatrics.  After earning her doctorate, Abouezzeddine completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she specialised in pediatric neuropsychology assessing children with traumatic brain injury, seizure disorders, and learning and developmental disabilities.

In addition to clinical and academic work, Abouezzeddine is heavily involved in ministry both within her community and internationally. She has been in a position of leadership in her local Bible Study Fellowship class since 2006 and currently holds the position of class administrator.  She currently leads one of the children Sunday school classes at her home church and is involved with international holistic training with World Orphans.

Credits to Biola University

Published: 21 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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