Chelsea Weilburg

Chelsea WeilburgChelsea Weilburg is an Adjunct Associate Professor at San Joaquin Delta College. Weilburg received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from California State University, Fresno. Shortly after, she completed her MSc in Educational Counselling at National University.

In addition to her time at Delta, she concurrently works as a school counsellor for the San Joaquin County Office of Education. Raised in Stockton, she is also a Delta College graduate, where she received her AA and was a founding member of Delta College’s psychology club: Delta Psi. Delta College was the beginning of her decision to become a psychology major, and eventually, a psychology professor. She enjoys hiking in the Bay Area, rescuing animals and collecting vinyl and used books.

Credits to San Joaquin Delta College

Published: 28 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Jamie Hacker Hughes

Jamie Hacker HughesJamie Hacker Hughes is a clinical psychologist, psychotherapist, clinical neuropsychologist, EMDR consultant and PTSD and trauma specialist with special expertise in military and veteran mental health. He gained his BSc (Hons) in Psychology from University College London in 1990, an MPhil in Psychopathology from University of Cambridge in 1991 and a PsychD in Clinical Psychology from University of Surrey in 1996.

Hughes has produced over 60 peer-reviewed papers, published reports, book chapters and conference papers in the areas of cognitive behavioural therapy, EMDR, clinical hypnosis and the psychological effects of military operations, including post-traumatic stress disorders. He is a reviewer for several journals, has published several book reviews and has presented on the subjects of his research and academic interests to audiences across the world. He became Clinical Senior Lecturer at the Academic Centre for Defence Mental Health at King’s College London in 1994, and was appointed Head of Defence Clinical Psychology for the MoD in 2007 and became Defence Consultant Advisor in Psychology in 2008.

In 2004,  he became an Honorary Senior Lecturer in Military Psychology at King’s College London, an Honorary Lecturer in Psychology at City University London and a Visiting Professor at Anglia Ruskin University and University of Hertfordshire. He is also an Honorary Consultant Advisor to the charity Soldier On!, Honorary Joint President of the Cardiff Samaritans and a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, the Counselling and Psychotherapy Society, the Hypnosis Society and the Royal Society of Medicine.

Currently, he is the President Elect of British Psychology Society.

Some of his publications include:

    • Frappell-Cooke, W, Gulina, M, Green, K, Hacker Hughes, JGH and Greenberg, N  (2010). Does trauma risk management reduce psychological distress in deployed  troops? Occupational Medicine  doi:10.1093/occmed/kqq149
    • Gould, M, Hacker Hughes, J and Norris, R. (2009). UK Armed Forces’ approach to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT): The occupational factor. Clinical Psychology Forum, 19.
    • Campion, BH, Hacker Hughes, JGH and Fear, NT  (2006). Psychological morbidity during the 2002 deployment to Afghanistan. Journal of the Royal  Army Medical Corps, 152, 91-3.

You can follow him on Twitter

For further information and full list of his publications you can visit his website here.

Published: 28 October 2014

Last update: 04 February 2015

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Donna Berry

Donna BerryDonna Berry joined the School of Psychology at Keele University as a Lecturer in September 2012. Prior to this, she completed her BSc (Hons), MSc and PhD degrees at Lancaster University, before working as a Postdoctoral Research Assistant at Northumbria University from 2010 to 2012. She has taught Psychology at Lancaster University, Open University and Northumbria University, and supervised a number of undergraduate and masters student projects at Open University and Northumbria University.

Her research focuses on cognitive control over visual attention, particularly on the ability to suppress interference and inhibit inappropriate eye movements. She use eye tracking and video coding to determine what captures our attention in our environment, and to measure when eye contact is made and broken during interactions, in typical children and adults, and in participants with autism and ADHD.

Berry is also the Psychology Careers Advisor, BPS Rep and Psychological Society Coordinator at Keele University.

Credits to Keele University

Published: 28 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Helen Williams

Helen WilliamsHelen Williams is a lecturer in psychology at Keele University. She joined the School of Psychology at Keele as a Lecturer in October 2013. Prior to this she received her BSc, MSc and PhD from the University of Leeds before moving to North America. From 2010 until 2012 she worked as a Postdoctoral Research and Teaching Fellow at the University of Richmond and from 2012 until 2013 she completed a second Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Victoria.

Williams’s research interests are metacognitive awareness, recognition memory, the Remember-Know paradigm, and cognitive ageing and associated issues. Her research mostly deals with higher order cognitive processes, specifically the judgements people can make when learning information or retrieving material from memory. The majority of her research to date has focused on how people make and understand judgements of subjective experience using an extension of Tulving’s (1985) Remember-Know paradigm that includes separate categories of Familiar and Guess. The central themes in her PhD research were: How should the subjective experiences of Knowing and Familiarity be defined and understood? What is the relationship between confidence and subjective experience? And how do objective manipulations influence subjective experience?

Williams has also done research into the associative deficit in ageing; person perception: ageing and Alzheimer’s disease; metacognitive awareness: judgements-of-learning (JOLs); and autobiographical memory. More information about her research can be found here.

Her publications include:

  • Williams, H.L., Conway, M.A., & Moulin, C.J.A. (2013). Remembering and Knowing: Using another’s subjective report to make inferences about memory strength and subjective experience. Consciousness and Cognition, 22, 572-588.
  • Souchay, C., Wojcik, D.Z., Williams, H.L., Crathern, S., & Clarke, P. (2013). Recollection in adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Cortex, 49(6), 1598-1609.
  • Berry, J.M., Williams, H.L., Usuabalieva, A., & Kilb, A. (2013). Metacognitive awareness of the associative deficit for words and names. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 20(5), 592-619.

Credits to: Keele University

Published: 28 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Diane Harris

HeadshotDiane Harris joined the Clinical/School programme of San Francisco State University in 1990 and now serves as Coordinator of the School Psychology programme of the Clinical/School programme. Harris received her BA from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and her MAEdS and PhD from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Harris has taught several of the clinical programme graduate courses including the year-long assessment course (Psy 721 and 722) and the second-year Advanced Psychopathology and Family Theory/Therapy courses (Psy 821 and 822). She has been a supervisor/ coordinator for a first-year “team”, and has served as liaison between the University and the School districts where the advanced fieldwork placements are located.

Harris researches how family relationships and childhood experiences influence a child’s relationship with food, their self-image and risk for obesity. She is a clinical psychologist and has her own private practice working with adults, children and couples. In one of her research projects, she explores the impact of cultural diversity on the assessment and treatment of eating disorders.

Harris is licensed to practice as a Psychologist in California and Massachusetts, and holds School Psychologist Credentials in both states.

Credits to: San Francisco State University

Published: 28 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Thomas Brothen

Portraits, 2007Thomas Brothen is a Professor of Psychology at University of Minnesota. His primary research has involved developing and examining online course management systems and other technology to improve post-secondary student learning. In addition, Brothen researches the teaching of psychology and how technology can be utilised to improve it. Also, he is interested in the history of psychology and the influence of psychological theory and research on large-scale educational interventions.

He earned his PhD in Psychology from University of Minnesota in 1976.

His publications include:

  • Brothen, T. (2012). What Ever Happened to John Dodson?. History of Psychology, 15, 100-105.
  • Brothen, T., Wambach, C. (2007). Internet vs. classroom access in a hybrid psychology course for developmental students.. Research and Teaching in Developmental Education, 23(2), 15-22.
  • Brothen, T., Wambach, C. (2005). Refocusing developmental education. Journal of Developmental Education, 28(2), 16-18, 20, 22, 30

Credits to University of Minnesota

Published: 27 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Milagros Lagrosa

Milagros LagrosaMilagros Lagrosa is a professor at Asian Institute of Management. She was involved in its FAMCOR (family corporations) programme and its pioneering programme on Leading from Higher Ground: Cultivating a Spirited Workplace.

A creative educator and specialist in human development, leadership and group-centred learning methodologies, Lagrosa has dedicated nearly three decades of her professional life teaching learners at different developmental levels (secondary school to graduate school) in the subject areas of biological/physical sciences, theology, maths and psychology, particularly human resource development (HRD).

Lagrosa was a full-time faculty member of the Department of Psychology of the Ateneo de Manila University (1982-2001) where she also taught educational psychology and statistics at the University’s Department of Education. She handled group process for formators at EMMAUS, a centre for continuing education of religious men and women and church lay workers (1995-1996). She was a special Lecturer of biology and philosophy of man at the Dominican House of Studies (1978-1979). She was Supervising Teacher of biological science at the University of Santo Tomas.

Credits to Asian Institute of Management

Last update: 27 October 2014

Published: 22 April 2015

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Claude Mellins

Claude MellinsClaude Mellins is a clinical psychologist with research and clinical expertise in psychosocial aspects of HIV disease in families and children. Over the past 15 years she has completed projects examining individual and family psychosocial factors mediating medical adherence in HIV infected women and children; sexual and drug use risk behaviour in uninfected youth with HIV infected mothers; and psychiatric and psychological functioning in HIV-infected mothers and children.

Mellins is a Professor of Psychology (in Psychiatry) at the Columbia University Medical Centre, New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is currently the Principal Investigator of an NIMH-funded R01 grant: MH069133 Mental Health and Risk Behaviour in HIV+ Youth and Seroreverter, one of the few studies examining psychiatric disorders and sexual and drug risk behaviour in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents. Mellins is also an investigator and member of the neurodevelopment subcommittee of the Women and Infants Transmission Study (NIDA; U01 DA15053), a multisite study of HIV-infected pregnant women and their children. Most recently, Mellins has worked closely with providers and intervention researchers to develop and pilot a family based prevention intervention for perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and their caregivers (CHAMP+: Supporting HIV+ youth and their families; PI Mary McKay, Co-PIs Claude Mellins and Elaine Abrams). She is also the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Special Needs Clinic at New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH), a mental health clinic for HIV-affected women, children, and families that has provided care to over 1400 patients since 1992.

She finished her PhD and Master’s degree from University of Southern California. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Brown University.

Credits to Columbia University

Published: 27 October 2014

Last update: 03 November 2015

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Jaime Licauco

Jaime LicaucoJaime Licauco is a parapsychologist, author, and management practitioner in the Philippines. He is the founder and president of the Inner Mind Development Institute, a training centre for parapsychology, philosophy, psychic investigation, and metaphysics.

Licauco has worked for 25 years, in middle and upper business management levels in ten corporations, mostly in human resource, management training and development, and consultancy.

Also, he has taught English, Philosophy, Christian Ethics, and Sociology at San Beda College; parapsychology at De La Salle University-Manila; and Intuitive Decision Making, Creativity, Remote Viewing, and Telepathy at the Asian Institute of Management. He also speaks at local and international conferences, seminars, and workshops.

He established the Inner Mind Development Institute, a training school for metaphysics and parapsychology. He conducts seminars on Inner Mind Development, ESP, and Higher Awareness at the Institute and other venues for other organisations.

You may visit his website at jimmylicauco.com

Credits to  Who Forted?

Published: 24 October 2014

Last update: 21  February 2015

Margaret Floy Washburn

Margaret Floy WashburnMargaret Floy Washburn was an early 20th century psychologist who conducted extensive research on animal behaviour and motor development. She was the first woman to earn a PhD in psychology.

Washburn was born in New York City on 25 July 1871. She began college at the age of 16 and soon became a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. When she graduated from Vassar in 1891, she wanted to study at Columbia University. At that time, women weren’t generally permitted in graduate programmes; Washburn was permitted to sit in on classes at Columbia as an observer. She went on to attend the Sage School of Philosophy at Cornell University to work with experimental psychologist E.B. Titchener, who founded the theory of psychological structuralism. Washburn was responsible for all experiments and research. She earned her master’s degree in 1893, and one year later, she made history as the first woman to earn a PhD in psychology.

She spent six years teaching psychology, ethics, and philosophy at Wells College for women, two years as warden at Sage College for women, and one year leading the psychology department at the University of Cincinnati. Ultimately, Washburn returned to Vassar in 1903 as an associate professor in psychology. She advanced to professor of psychology in 1908, and she remained there until a stroke necessitated her retirement in 1937. Washburn was active in the American Psychological Association, and she served as president for the association in 1921. She was also a member of the National Research Council and the second woman to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Washburn died in 1939.

As one of the earliest women to enter the field of psychology, Washburn served as evidence that women could effectively contribute to the field. She extensively studied animal behaviour and argued that animals’ mental states should be studied alongside their behaviour. She outlined these arguments in her 1908 book, The Animal Mind. The book was widely popular and heavily researched, outlining numerous experiments in animal psychology, consciousness, and behaviour. Unlike some of her contemporaries, who focused primarily on rodents, Washburn examined the behaviour of over 100 different animal species.

Washburn was interested in learning how mental states could be revealed through visible behaviours, and this led to intensive study of motor development. She argued that conscious thought was evident in behaviour; in other words, all mental functions produce physical reactions. Her book Movement and Mental Imagery introduced her theory regarding the correlation between mental processes and motor skills. Similarly, Washburn believed that psychology should include the study of behaviour and consciousness—a radical notion that blended two popular schools of thought on psychology at the time: introspectionism and behaviourism. She wrote more than a hundred scholarly articles on topics including memory, experimental psychology, animal behaviour and psychology, consciousness, spatial reasoning and individual differences in behaviour.

Unlike many psychologists of her time, Washburn rejected much of psychodynamic theory, arguing that it was too speculative. Instead, she embraced elements of functionalism, gestalt psychology, and behaviourism, though her work in animal cognition undermined some tenets of traditional behaviourism.

Credits to GoodTherapy

Published: 24 October 2014

Last update: 04 April 2015

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Zara Bergström

Zara Bergström is a lecturer in Cognitive Psychology at University of Kent. Her research investigates interactions between intentional and automatic processes during long-term memory retrieval. Bergström is particularly interested in the neurocognitive mechanisms that allow us to control what aspects of our past we consciously remember —both in terms of facilitating memories that we want to retrieve, but also preventing unwanted memories from automatically coming to mind. She uses a combination of behavioural and cognitive neuroscience techniques (EEG, MEG, fMRI, TMS) to address questions such as: a) Does conflict between intentional and automatic memory systems lead to forgetting? b) What are the neurocognitive mechanisms that enable us to stop unwanted retrieval? c) Is memory-related brain activity under voluntary control, and if so, what are the implications for tests that use brain activity markers of memory as evidence of criminal guilt? d) How do frontal and parietal brain regions interact over time to facilitate recollection of particular memories? e) Is there a common brain network that mediates cognitive control across different domains such as memory, attention and action?

She welcomes applications from potential doctoral students interested in the above research questions or other related topics in cognitive psychology/neuroscience of memory.

Her publications include:

  • Bergström, Z. M., Anderson, M. C., Buda, M., Simons, J. S., & Richardson-Klavehn, A. (2013). Intentional retrieval suppression can conceal guilty knowledge in ERP memory detection tests. Biological Psychology, 94, 1-11.
  • Bergström, Z. M., Henson, R. N., Taylor, J. T., & Simons, J. S. (2013). Multimodal imaging reveals the spatiotemporal dynamics of recollection. Neuroimage, 68, 141-153.
  • Bergström, Z. M., De Fockert, J., & Richardson-Klavehn, A. (2009). ERP and behavioural evidence for direct suppression of unwanted memories. NeuroImage, 48, 726-37.

Credits to University of Kent

Published: 24 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Tes Tuason

Tes TuasonTes Tuason is a full Professor in the Mental Health Counseling programme at the Brooks College of Health of University of North Florida and is a licensed clinical psychologist. Tuason was born and raised in the Philippines and came to the United States to do her PhD in Counselling Psychology at University at Albany, State University of New York. She did her internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Utah. She received the Dean’s Leadership Council Faculty Fellowship in 2004, the Outstanding International Leadership Award in 2008, the Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award in 2009, the Susan B. Anthony Award in 2011, and the Outstanding Faculty Scholarship Award in 2012. She completed both her bachelor’s and master’s degree in Psychology from Ateneo de Manila University.

Her research interests express her advocacy as a counselling psychologist – specifically in addressing a) social issues such as poverty and inequities, and social justice issues related to counselling minority populations (in terms of ethnicity, race, sexual orientation and socio-economic status), b) conducting research that is respectful and appreciative of culture given our global community, specifically of the populations of developing countries such as the Philippines, (overseas workers, parenting, differentiation from family and alcoholism) and c) family, child and adolescent clinical issues utilising the systems perspective.

Through teaching, research, and practice, she continues to work to give the underserved a voice and to make the face of the poor and marginalised more concrete, palpable and within reach of alleviation efforts.

Her publications include:

  • Tuason, M. T., Ancheta, I. B., & Battie, C. A. (in press). What impacts the psychological health of Filipino American women? Asian American Journal of Psychology.
  • Güss, C. D., & Tuason, M. T. (2014). The importance of cultural variables for explaining suicide terrorism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37(4), 370-371.
  • Ancheta, I. B., Battie, C. A., Tuason, M. T., Borja-Hart, N., & Ancheta, C. V. (2014). The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes increases with a body mass index of ≥ 23 KG/M2 in Filipino American women. Ethnicity and Disease, 24, 48-54.

Credits to: University of North Florida

Published: 23 October 2014

Last update: 04 April 2015

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Allan B.I. Bernardo

Allan B.I. BernardoAllan B. I. Bernardo is a cognitive psychologist and educational psychologist based in Manila, Philippines. He received his PhD in cognitive psychology in Yale University (1992), and has been teaching at De La Salle University since 1996.

His research interests are broad—ranging from cognitive psychology topics such as representation of number information among bilinguals, development of problem solving schemas, and factors affecting the components of mathematical problem solving to educational psychology topics such as the role of language, motivation, and non-cognitive variables on learning and achievement, and cognitive consequences of literacy practices. His most recent research interests relate to the role of culturally-rooted cognitions and beliefs on learning and achievement.

He has also been a strong advocate of promoting psychology research in the Philippines, serving as officer of the Psychological Association of the Philippines and the Pambansang Samahan sa Sikolohiyang Pilipino (National Society for Philippine Psychology) for many years, and organising varied psychology conferences and activities in the country.

His works in psychology have been recognised in the Philippines. Most notably, the 2002 Achievement Award for Research by the National Research Council of the Philippines, and the 2003 The Outstanding Young Men Award for his works in Psychology and Education.

He was also awarded the Spencer Fellowship by the National Academy of Education (USA) and the International Award for Literacy Research by the UNESCO Institute for Education, both in 1996. In 2007, he was elected into the Philippines’ National Academy of Science and Technology, becoming the first psychologist elected into the prestigious group.

His recent publications include:

  • Bernardo, A. B. I. (2014). Hope in early adolescence: Measuring internal and external locus-of-hope. Child Indicators Research. Published online June 2014, doi:10.1007/s12187-014-9254-6
  • Bernardo, A. B. I., & Estrellado, A. F. (2014). Measuring hope in the Philippines: Validating the short version of the Locus-of-Hope Scale in Filipino. Social Indicators Research. Published online January 2014, doi:10.1007/s11205-013-0573-7
  • Bernardo, A. B. I., Clemente, J. A. R., & Liem, G. A. D. (2014, in press). Describing values of Filipino adolescents: A comparison with pan-cultural norms. Journal of Tropical Psychology, 4, doi:10.1017/jtp.2014.2

Credits to: Victoria University of Wellington

Published: 20 October 2014

Last update: 27 February 2015

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Emma Alleyne

Emma AlleyneEmma Alleyne is a Lecturer in Psychology at University of Kent. Alleyne conducts research within the areas of forensic and social psychology. Her theoretical and empirical work examine socio-cognitive and group processes that underlie group offending. For instance, her research explores what differentiates gang youth and non-gang youth with similar social/environmental backgrounds. Recently, Alleyne’s interests have expanded to include multiple-perpetrator rape (MPR). She is currently researching the psychological factors that distinguish MPR offenders from lone perpetrators in relation to their treatment needs. Alleyne has also begun researching in the area of firesetting behavior and the clinical treatment of firesetters (particularly in women).

Alleyne welcomes prospective doctoral students to get in touch if they are interested in my research areas or other related topics in forensic psychology.

Her key publications include:

  • Wood, J.L., Alleyne, E., Mozova, K., & James, M. (in press). Does being a street gang member lead to prison gang involvement: Links and psychological mechanisms. Law and Human Behavior.
  • Alleyne, E., Gannon, T.A., Ó Ciardha, C., & Wood, J.L. (in press). Community males show multiple-perpetrator rape proclivity: Development and preliminary validation of an interest scale. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment.
  • Alleyne, E., & Wood, J. (2010). Gang involvement: Psychological and behavioural characteristics of gang members, peripheral youth and non-gang youth, Aggressive Behavior, 36, 423-436.
  • Wood, J., & Alleyne, E. (2010). Street gang theory and research: Where are we now and where do we go from here? Special Issue: Group Processes and Aggression; Gannon, T.A. and Wood J.L., (Eds) Aggression and Violent Behavior, p. 100 – 111.

Credits to University of Kent

Published: 20 October 2014

Last update: 07 March 2015

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Adam Qureshi

Adam QureshiAdam Qureshi is a lecturer in psychology at Edge Hill University. In 2009, he earned his PhD Psychology at University of Birmingham. He also holds MRes from University of Birmingham. He finished his BSc Psychology from Coventry University in 2003 and BSc Chemistry from University of Warwick.

Qureshi’s research interests include social cognition, executive function and the contribution of executive function to social cognition. He is also looking into the perspective taking and theory of mind in adults, and the role of theory of mind and gaze direction in online communication using virtual agents.

His publications include:

  • Peters, C., & Qureshi, A. (2010). A head movement propensity model for animating gaze shifts and blinks of virtual characters. Computers and Graphics,  34, 677-687.
  • Qureshi, A., Apperly, I. A., & Samson, D. (2010). Executive function is necessary for perspective-selection, not Level-1 visual perspective-calculation: Evidence from a dual-task study of adults. Cognition, 117,  230-236
  • Apperly, I.A., Carroll, D.J., Samson, D., Qureshi, A., Humphreys GW & Moffatt G  (2010). Why are there limits on theory of mind use? Evidence from adults’ ability to follow instructions from an ignorant speaker. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 63, 1201-1217.

Credits to Edge Hill University

Published: 06 October 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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