Mark Forshaw

Mark ForshawMark Forshaw is a Health Psychologist and is currently Subject Leader in Health and Applied Psychology at Liverpool John Moores University. Forshaw is also the Principal Consultant at Horizon Shine, He is a nationally recognised expert on training in psychology, and President of the Institute of Health Promotion and Education, an organisation over 50 years old. He is a Trustee of the British Psychological Society, and Chair of the Membership Standards Board, having previously held many senior positions within the BPS. He sits on the Board of Directors of the Occupational Safety and Health Consultants Register, and has consulted widely for various public and private sector organisations. Forshaw is an active researcher; his publications stretch from textbooks through to peer-reviewed research articles in a range of areas including menopause, disability, kidney disease, industrial illness, and health behaviours. He has been involved in coaching and training for many years, and provides the senior steer in the Horizon Shine team.

His recent publications include:

  • Murray, C. D., Simpson, J., Eccles, F., & Forshaw, M. J. (2014). Involvement in rehabilitative care and wellbeing for partners of people with an amputation. Psychology, health & medicine, (ahead-of-print), 1-6.
  • Hare, J., Clark-Carter, D., & Forshaw, M. (2014). A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural group approach to improve patient adherence to peritoneal dialysis fluid restrictions: a pilot study. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 29(3), 555-564.
  • Murray, C. D., & Forshaw, M. J. (2013). The experience of amputation and prosthesis use for adults: a metasynthesis. Disability and rehabilitation, 35(14), 1133-1142.

Credits to Horizon Shine

Published: 12 November 2014

Last update: 21 April 2015

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Jennifer Weston

Jennifer WestonJennifer Weston is a Health Psychologist and owner of Horizon Shine who qualified from Staffordshire University after completing an MSC in Health Psychology and BSc in Applied Psychology. She is a full member of the the British Psychological Society, the Division of Health Psychology and the BPS Special Group in Coaching Psychology. She is currently the Memberships and Promotions Officer for the Midlands Health Psychology Network. Weston is trained in compassionate mind therapy and offers mindfulness techniques as part of her coaching strategy. Her areas of expertise lie in health behaviour change, coping with illness, relaxation and dealing with stress and anxiety. She has worked within a range of health settings – improving the lives of stroke surviviors and people affected by cancer including carers.

Weston has previously worked for the Cochrane Epilepsy Group where she has published an extensive number of Cochrane systematic reviews in the field of epilepsy. She has undertaken 1-1 training in coaching alongside her doctoral degree.

You can follow her on Twitter

Credits to Horizon Shine

Published: 11 November 2014

Last update: 09 April 2015

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Linas Bieliauskas

Linas BieliauskasLinas Bieliauskas is a Professor of Psychology, Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is also the Senior Editor of Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition.

He has been teaching at University of Michigan since 1989. Bieliauskas studies emotional and cognitive effects of normal and abnormal ageing. Multiple studies are ongoing, ranging from association between affect and cognition to characteristics of psychometric measures.

Bieliauskas served as president for International Neuropsychological Society and Division of Clinical Neuropsychology at American Psychological Association.

In 1976, he earned his PhD from Ohio University. He obtained his BSc from Xavier University.

His publications include:

  • Briceño, E. M., Rapport, L. J., Kassel, M. T., Bieliauskas, L. A., Zubieta, J. K., Weisenbach, S. L., & Langenecker, S. A. (2014). Age and gender modulate the neural circuitry supporting facial emotion processing in adults with major depressive disorder. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
  • Lucas, J. A., Mahone, E. M., Westerveld, M., Bieliauskas, L., & Baron, I. S. (2014). The American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology: Updated Milestones 2005–2014. The Clinical neuropsychologist, 28(6), 889-906.
  • Spencer, R. J., Axelrod, B. N., Drag, L. L., Waldron-Perrine, B., Pangilinan, P. H., & Bieliauskas, L. A. (2013). WAIS-IV Reliable Digit Span is no More Accurate Than Age Corrected Scaled Score as an Indicator of Invalid Performance in a Veteran Sample Undergoing Evaluation for mTBI. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 27(8), 1362-1372.

Credits to University of Michigan

Published: 11 November 2014

Last update: 21 April 2015

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Haiko Ballieux

Haiko BallieuxHaiko Ballieux is a Lecturer in Developmental Psychology at University of Westminster. He finished an MSc in Developmental and Experimental Psychology at the University of Amsterdam, and an MSc in Cognitive Science at the Cognitive Science Centre Amsterdam (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies).

In 2006, Ballieux moved to London for a Marie Curie PhD Fellowship at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development (CBCD) at Birkbeck, University of London (under supervision of Denis Mareschal), where he used both eye-tracking and behavioural measures to investigate infant object perception, action perception and action production/imitation.

After finishing his PhD in 2010 he worked both as a researcher and a lecturer at the University of East London (UEL). In September 2013 Ballieux moved to the University of Westminster where he works as a Lecturer in Developmental Psychology.

At Birkbeck, Ballieux was a Seminar Group Leader on the Critical Analysis Course, as well as a Demonstrator on the Research Methods Course, both for undergraduate students.

At UEL Ballieux has worked as a Lecturer Developmental Psychology, and became an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

At the University of Westminster he is a module leader of the Level 6 module ‘Advanced Developmental Psychology’. Ballieux is also teaching on the modules ‘Research Methods in Psychology’ (level 4), ‘Foundations of Cognitive Neuroscience’ (level 4), ‘Developmental Psychology’ (level 5), ‘Psychology of Education’ (level 6), ‘Sensory Brain’ (level 6), and ‘Fundamentals of Psychology’ (MSc).

His publications include:

  • Kushnerenko, Elena and Tomalski, Przemyslaw and Ballieux, Haiko and Ribeiro, Helena and Potton, Anita and Axelsson, Emma L. and Murphy, Elizabeth and Moore, Derek G. (2013) Brain responses to audiovisual speech mismatch in infants are associated with individual differences in looking behaviour. European Journal of Neuroscience, 38 (9). pp. 3363-3369. ISSN 0953-816X
  • Edmonds, Caroline J. and Crombie, Rosanna and Ballieux, Haiko and Gardner, Mark and Dawkins, Lynne (2013) Water consumption, not expectancies about water consumption, affects cognitive performance in adults. Appetite, 60 . pp. 148-153. ISSN 0195-6663
  • Tomalski, Przemyslaw and Ribeiro, Helena and Ballieux, Haiko and Axelsson, Emma L. and Murphy, Elizabeth and Moore, Derek G. and Kushnerenko, Elena (2013) Exploring early developmental changes in face scanning patterns during the perception of audiovisual mismatch of speech cues. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 10 (5). pp. 611-624. ISSN 1740-5629

Credits to University of Westminster

Published: 11 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Zainab Alkhoee

HeadshotZainab Alkhoee is a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Westminster and joined the university as a Visiting Lecturer in 2004. Prior to this, Alkhoee graduated from her first degree in Psychology in 2003 at the University of Westminster. She then went on to participate on a teaching course at Westminster Exchange and completed her PGCertHE in 2010.

Alkhoee has taught on a number of different psychology modules at the University of Westminster. These modules include, The Psychology of Education, The History and Philosophy of Psychology, Forensic Psychology, Social Psychology, Advanced Social Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Advanced Developmental Psychology. Zainab is co-module leader for The Myth and Method in Psychology module that runs at the University of Westminster’s Liberal Arts Summer School, she co-wrote the Psychology of City Life module that also runs in the Summer School and is a lecturer on this module.

Alkhoee’s interests include the Psychology of Education, Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology. She has been involved in research in the psychology department, investigating first year psychology students learning experiences.

Credits to University of Westminster

Published: 11 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Vilayanur Subramanian Ramachandran

Vilayanur Subramanian RamachandranVilayanur Subramanian Ramachandran has been described by Richard Dawkins as “The Marco Polo of neuroscience.” His studies of phantom limbs, synesthesia and body integrity identity disorder have garnered international attention. Furthermore, Ramachandran invented the “mirror box,” which is used to assuage phantom limb pain. Ramachandran’s works have also branched out into the study of autism and the evolution of language.

Ramachandran obtained an MBBS from the University of Madras and subsequently obtained a PhD from University of Cambridge. He then spent two years at Caltech, as a research fellow working with Jack Pettigrew. He was appointed Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of California, San Diego in 1983, and has been a full professor there since 1998.

Working at the University of California, San Diego, Ramachandran is Director of the Centre for Brain and Cognition as well as Distinguished Professor with the school’s psychology department and neurosciences programme. Additionally, he is Adjunct Professor of Biology at La Jolla, California’s Salk Institute. Ramachandran has received multiple awards and has penned a New York Times bestseller, The Tell Tale Brain. In 2011 Ramachandran made it onto the “Time100” list of influential people.

Credits to Best Masters in Psychology

Published: 10 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Juliet Hassard

Juliet Hassard is a Lecturer in Organisational Psychology at Birkbeck, University of London. Hassard is a candidate for PhD Applied Psychology at University of Nottingham. She obtained her MSc in Occupational Health Psychology also from Nottingham. She finished her BA in 2006 from University of Manitoba.

Prior to joining Birkbeck she was a Research Associate at the Institute of Work Health and Organisation of University of Nottingham.

Hassard has always had a strong interest in the role that psychological and social factors play in physical and mental health, both in modifying the risk of disease and in promoting the sustainable health and well-being of individuals and communities. Her research interests lie in the intersection of these three disciplines within the applied context of understanding the psychological, social and environmental impacts on health and illness. She has a strong interest in understanding how applied psychology, or more broadly applied social sciences, can utilise the work environment to prevent illness and disease, but moreover, promote the sustainable health and well-being of workers, organisations and communities.

Some of her publications include:

  • Leka, S., Hassard, J. & Yanagida, A. (2011) Occupational stress in psychiatric hospital nurses in Japan: The impact of the psychosocial work environment and symptoms of general wellbeing. Journal of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Services, 19(2), 123-131.
  • Houdmont, J., Zhou, J., Hassard, J. (2011).Overtime and psychosocial wellbeing among Chinese office workers. Occupational Medicine, 61(4), 270-273.

Credits to Birkbeck, University of London

Published: 10 November 2014

Last update: 03 May 2016

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Natalie Allen

Natalie AllenNatalie Allen is a Full-time Faculty at University of Western Ontario. She finished her BA from Mount Allison University in 1978  and a year after, she obtained her MA at Dalhousie University. She holds a PhD from University of Western Ontario.

Over the past several years, her research has examined the conceptualisation, development and consequences of work attitudes – in particular, the employee’s commitment to his or her organisation and occupation. More recent research examines teams and work groups. Specifically, Allen is interested in the composition of such teams, the linkages between teams and the organisations in which they are embedded and the reactions people have toward working in teams.

Her publications include:

  • O’Neill, T.A., Allen, N.J. & Hastings, S. (in press). Examining the ‘pros’ and ‘cons’ of team conflict: A team-level meta-analysis of task, relationship, and process conflict Human Performance.
  • Ross, S.J., & Allen, N.J. (in press). Examining the convergent validity of shared mental model measures. Behavior Research Methods.
  • Bingham, J.B., Mitchell, B.W., Bishop, D.G., & Allen, N.J. (in press). Working for a higher purpose: A theoretical framework for commitment to organization-sponsored causes. Human Resource Management Review.

Credits to University of Western Ontario

Published: 10 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Julia Kristeva

Julia KristevaJulia Kristeva is a Bulgarian-French psychoanalyst and a Professor at University Paris Diderot. Kristeva taught at Columbia University in the early 1970s, and remains a Visiting Professor. She has also published under the married name Julia Joyaux. Her alma mater is University of Sofia.

Kristeva argues that anthropology and psychology, or the connection between the social and the subject, do not represent each other, but rather follow the same logic: the survival of the group and the subject. Furthermore, in her analysis of Oedipus, she claims that the speaking subject cannot exist on his/her own, but that he/she “stands on the fragile threshold as if stranded on account of an impossible demarcation”.

In her comparison between the two disciplines, Kristeva claims that the way in which an individual excludes the abject mother as a means of forming an identity, is the same way in which societies are constructed. On a broader scale, cultures exclude the maternal and the feminine, and by this come into being. Kristeva is also noted for her work on the concept of intertextuality, the shaping of a text’s meaning by another text.

In the past decade, Kristeva has written a number of novels that resemble detective stories. While the books maintain narrative suspense and develop a stylised surface, her readers also encounter ideas intrinsic to her theoretical projects. Her characters reveal themselves mainly through psychological devices, making her type of fiction mostly resemble the later work of Dostoevsky. Her fictional oeuvre, which includes The Old Man and the Wolves, Murder in Byzantium, and Possessions, while often allegorical, also approaches the autobiographical in some passages, especially with one of the protagonists of Possessions, Stephanie Delacour—a French journalist—who can be seen as Kristeva’s alter ego. Murder in Byzantium deals with themes from orthodox Christianity and politics and has been described by Kristeva as “a kind of anti-Da Vinci Code.

Her selected works include:

  • Kristeva, J. (2013). Melanie Klein (Vol. 2). Columbia University Press.
  • Kristeva, J. (2013). Hatred and forgiveness. Columbia University Press.
  • Kristeva, J. (2011). This incredible need to believe. Columbia University Press.

Published: 10 November 2014

Last update: 04 April 2015

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Maria Caridad Tarroja

Maria Caridad TarrojaMaria Caridad Tarroja is a clinical psychologist from the Philippines. Tarroja is also one of the founding member of PsychConsult. She has been a board member of the Psychological Association of the Philippines since 2007 and was its past President from 2010-2012. She is also a full-time Associate Professor of the Psychology Department at De La Salle University, and previously served as its Chair and Vice-Chair. She also took the helm at PsychConsult as Clinical Director from June 2006 to May 2010. She hold a PhD, Clinical Psychology and MA, Counselling Psychology both from Ateneo de Manila University.

Passionate about teaching and doing psychological assessment, Tarroja has been engaged in assessment in the last 18 years in the clinical, industrial and psychoeducational areas. Her research interests include the impact of pre-adoption risks and family functioning on the behaviours of adopted children, families of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs), supervision, and clinical assessment. She has presented papers both in local and international conferences. She serves as Chair of the Philippine Social Science Council from 2014 to 2016.

Her publications include:

  • Tarroja, M. C. H., & Fernando, K. C. (2013). Providing psychological services for children of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs): A challenge for school psychologists in the Philippines. School Psychology International, 34(2), 202-212.
  • Tarroja, M. C. H. (2012). Filipino Adoptive Families’ Experiences: A Qualitative Analysis of Disclosure and Adjustment Issues. Philippine Journal of Psychology, 40(1).
  • Tarroja, M. C. H., Balajadia-Alcala, M. A., & Co, S. A. C. (2012). The Impact of Family Composition and Last Incident of Abuse on the Psychosocial W ell-being of Abused Children. Philippine Journal of Psychology, 40(2).

Credits to PsychConsult

Published: 10 November 2014

Last update: 04 April 2015

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Claire Fox

Claire FoxClaire Fox is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Keele University. Fox re-joined the School of Psychology in September 2004 as a Teaching Fellow and Learning Support Tutor and became a lecturer in September 2005 and a Senior Lecturer in 2011. She former PhD student and Graduate Teaching Assistant of the department (during the period 1998-2001). Her PhD focused on identifying the social skills problems that put children at risk of being bullied. Also, Fox developed and ran a Social Skills Training Programme for children bullied by their peers, and evaluated the effectiveness of this intervention. Following her PhD, Fox worked as a Research Associate in the School of Social Relations on a project to evaluate the work of the NSPCC Schools Teams (2001-2003), and for one year she was a member of the research team based at the University of Birmingham responsible for the National Evaluation of the Children’s Fund.

Fox is committed to conducting applied social psychological research which has both theoretical and practical implications. In particular, she is interested in the problem of bullying in schools and domestic abuse. Supported by two research grants in 2009 (from the British Psychological Society and British Academy), Fox developed a humour styles questionnaire for children and young people and have recently completed a longitudinal study funded by the ESRC to examine the links between children’s humour styles and the problem of bullying in schools, in collaboration with Simon Hunter at the University of Strathclyde and Sian Jones at Oxford Brookes University (project blog). Another collaboration with David Gadd and Ian Butler resulted in a major ESRC award of £385,000 over three years to examine the question of how to prevent more boys from becoming perpetrators of domestic violence in later life. For further details see www.boystomenproject.com. They have also recently completed a European wide project supported by a substantial grant under the Daphne III call. The total sum was for 309,000 over two years starting in March 2011. The READAPT project (Relationship Education and Domestic Abuse Prevention Tuition) involved us working with 6 partners across Europe in the UK, Spain, Malta, France, Sweden and Belgium (www.readapt.eu)

Fox is the Chair of the Social Psychology research group and also organise the Children and Young People Research Group. As a member of the Centre for Psychological Research  she  sitswithin the Research Institute for Social Sciences.

Her publications include:

  • Fox CL, Gadd D, Sim J. 2014. Development of the Attitudes to Domestic Violence Questionnaire for Children and Adolescents. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. doi>
  • Gadd D, Fox CL, Hale R. 2014. Preliminary steps towards a more preventative approach to eliminating violence against women in Europe. European Journal of Criminology, 11(4), 464-480. link> doi>
  • Gadd D, Corr M-L, Fox CL, Butler I. 2014. This is Abuse… Or is it? Domestic abuse perpetrators’ responses to anti-domestic violence publicity. Crime Media Culture, 10(1), 3-22. link> doi>

Credits to Keele University

Published: 09 September 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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LaRue Allen

LaRue AllenLaRue Allen is Raymond and Rosalee Weiss Professor of Applied Psychology and Chair of the Department of Applied Psychology in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. She also directs the Child and Family Policy Centre which focuses on bringing social science knowledge to policymakers and practitioners concerned with children and their families. Her research interests include urban preschool, adolescent and emerging adult development; impact of social, cultural and ecological factors on human development; issues in cross-cultural and cross-national research methods and design, alignment of preschool assessment tools and civic engagement among adolescents and emerging adults. Allen was a visiting scholar at the Centre de Recherche de l’Education Spécialisée et de l’Adaptation Scolaire in Paris, France, where she conducts research on the role of parents and teachers in the development of civic attitudes and behaviours among youth.

She earned her AB from Radcliffe College, cum laude, in 1972. She finished both her MS and PhD from Yale University in 1977 and 1980, respectively.

Aside from English, she speak French and Spanish.

Her publicatins include:

  • Astuto, J., & Allen, L. (2009). Home Visitation and Young Children: An Approach Worth Investing In? Social Policy Report: Publication of the Society for Research in Child Development, 23(4).
  • Allen, L., Bat-Chava, Y., Aber, J.L. & Seidman, E. (2005). Adolescent Racial and Ethnic Identity in Context. In G. Downey, J. Eccles, & C. Chatman (Eds.), Navigating the future: Social Identity, Coping, and Life Tasks (pp.143-166). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

You can find her CV here.

Credits to New York University

Published: 04 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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J. Lawrence Aber

J. Lawrence AberJ. Lawrence Aber is Willner Family Professor in Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, and University Professor, New York University, where he also serves as board chair of its Institute of Human Development and Social Change.

Aber earned his PhD from Yale University and an AB from Harvard University. He previously taught at Barnard College, Columbia University, and at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, where he also directed the National Centre for Children in Poverty.

He is an internationally recognised expert in child development and social policy and has co-edited Neighbourhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children (1997, Russell Sage Foundation), Assessing the Impact of September 11th 2001 on Children Youth and Parents: Lessons for Applied Developmental Science (2004, Erlbaum) and Child Development and Social Policy: Knowledge for Action (2007, APA Publications). His basic research examines the influence of poverty and violence, at the family and community levels, on the social, emotional, behavioural, cognitive and academic development of children and youth.

Aber also designs and conducts rigorous evaluations of innovative programmes and policies for children, youth and families, such as violence prevention, literacy development, welfare reform and comprehensive services initiatives. Aber testifies frequently before Congress, state legislatures and other deliberative policy forums. The media, public officials, private foundations and leading non-profit organisations also frequently seek his opinion or advice about pressing matters concerning child and family well-being. In 2006, Aber was appointed by the Mayor of New York City to the Commission for Economic Opportunity, an initiative to help reduce poverty and increase economic opportunity in New York City.

In 2007, he served as the Nannerl O. Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professor at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2008 and 2009, he served part-time as Visiting Research Professor in Evidence-based Social Interventions in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work, University of Oxford. He is also Chair of the Board of Directors of the Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town; and served as consultant to the World Bank on its project, “Children and Youth in Crisis”. From 2003-2006, Aber chaired the Advisory Board, International Research Network on Children and Armed Conflict of the Social Science Research Council, in collaboration with the Special Representative to the Secretary General of the United Nations on Children and Armed Conflict and UNICEF. Currently, he conducts research on the impact of poverty and HIV/AIDS on children’s development in South Africa (in collaboration with the Human Sciences Research Council), and on school- and community-based interventions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (in collaboration with the International Rescue Committee).

His recent publications include:

  • Aber, J.L., J. Lombardi, S. Klaus, and K. Campion (2013). A new global development goal for the world’s youngest children. Commentary, Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC., (link)
  • Aber, J.L., Biersteker, L., Dawes, A., & Rawlings, L. (2013). Social Protection and Welfare Systems: Implications for Early Childhood Development. In Pia R. Britto, Patrice Engle, Charles Super, Lonnie Sherrod, & Nurper Ulkuer (Eds.) Fulfilling Every Child’s Potential: How Research Can Inform Global Policy. (pp 260-274). Oxford, UK: Oxford Press.
  • Aber, J.L. Grannis, K.S., Owen, S., & Sawhill, I. (2013). The Social Genome Project: Middle Childhood Success and Economic Mobility. Brookings Institute. (link)

Credits to New York University

Published: 04 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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Michael Addis

Michael AddisMichael Addis is a Professor at Department of Psychology at Clark University. Addis received his BA from University of California, Berkeley in 1987 and his PhD from University of Washington, Seattle in 1995. He has been at Clark since 1995.

Addis is currently interested in theory and research related to men’s mental health. In his work he focuses on links between the social learning and social construction of masculinity, and the way men experience, express, and respond to problems in their lives. Addis’s current research is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and seeks to understand psychosocial barriers to men’s use of mental health services. Addis is a past recipient of the New Researcher Award from the Association for the Advancement of Behaviour Therapy and the David Shakow Early Career Award for Contributions to the Science and Practice of Clinical Psychology from the American Psychological Association. He is past President-Elect of the Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity, Division 51 of the American Psychological Association.

His recent publications include:

  • Berger, J.L., Addis, M.E., Green, J.D., Mackowiak, C., & Goldberg, V. (in press). Men’s reactions to mental health labels, forms of help-seeking, and sources of help-seeking advice. Psychology of Men and Masculinity.
  • Syzdek, M. R., Addis, M. E., Green, J. D., Whorley, M. R., & Berger, J. L. (in press). Effects of gender-based motivational interviewing on help-seeking and internalizing symptoms in men. Psychology of Men and Masculinity.
  • Addis, M.E. & Schwab, J.R. (2013). Theory and Research on Gender is Always Precarious. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 14, 114-116.

You can view his CV here.

Credits to Clark University

Published: 04 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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John Culling

John CullingJohn Culling is Professor in School of Psychology at Cardiff University. He finished both his BSc and PhD at University of Sussex. His doctoral thesis “The perception of double vowels” mainly concerned the effect of differences in fundamental frequency on listeners’ ability to perceptually separate concurrent speech. The experiments all involved simultaneous synthetic vowels with controlled fundamental frequency; where the vowels differed in fundamental frequency, the ability to identify both vowels in a pair was improved, suggesting that they had been perceptually separated prior to identification. The results indicated that the effect was predominantly mediated by low frequencies, but also that waveform interactions between the vowels played a substantial role. Other experiments investigate the effects of dynamic changes in fundamental frequency and in timbre.

Culling’s research focuses on the cocktail-party problem, which concerns how listeners are able to cope with high levels of interfering noise when listening to speech. Typically, such interfering noise may consist of many other competing voices, as at a cocktail party or a busy restaurant. Humans (and other animals) remain far more proficient at this task than any automatic system. They are known to use many different mechanisms, all of which fall within my research interests, but most of my research concerns binaural hearing.

He teaches Normal and Impaired Hearing at level 3 (PS3308). Cullling’s lectures examine the auditory system from a mainly psychoacoustic perspective, explaining how the functions of the cochlea and brain can be elucidated purely through listening experiments. The physiology of the ear is mainly presented towards the end of the lecture series as an introduction to the effects hearing impairment and nature of the hearing facilitated by cochlear implantation. He also supervises level 2 practicals in perception, focussing on the parameters of the human voice, their sexual differentiation and the potential influence of these parameters on vocal attractiveness.

His publications include:

Credits to Cardiff University

Published: 04 November 2014

Last update: 22 April 2015

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