Maria Almoite

Maria AlmoiteMaria Almoite is a research assistant at Minnesota State University. Almoite have always enjoyed the complexity of problem solving. From the intricate mechanisms of the brain to simple queries about human behaviour, she had always had an insatiable desire for learning. These curiosities led her to academic research. As an undergraduate, she gained broad research training by being involved in several research laboratories. In spring 2011, Almoite worked with Dr Vinai Norasakkunkit on an international study in the field of cultural psychology. The research examined cross-cultural variation in the experiences of anger and shame in the USA, Belgium, and Japan. This study formed a novel approach to analysing cultural variation by conceiving emotional experience as conditional. As a research assistant, she was responsible for creating the debriefing form, overseeing data collection for the entire USA, and communicating with other research collaborators in Belgium and Japan regarding the progress of our study. Utilising her background and knowledge in application to scientific research and collaborating with international researchers is something that she hopes to continue in future projects.

You can follow her on Twitter @mariaalmoite

Credits to Maria Almoite

Published: 18 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Christopher Bailey

Christopher BaileyChristopher Bailey is a research technician in the Developmental Electrophysiology Lab at the Child Study Centre of Yale University. Bailey earned his undergraduate degree with high honours at the University of Buffalo, The State University of New York in 2006. His research interests focus on the neuropsychological constructs of social and emotional cognition as well as social neuroscience with the use of EEG.

His recent publications include:

  • Bailey, C.A. & Ostrov, J.M. (2007). Differentiating forms and functions of aggression in emerging adults: Associations with hostile attribution biases and normative beliefs. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 37, 713-722.

Credits to Yale University

Published: 15 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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