Paul Appelbaum

Paul AppelbaumPaul Appelbaum, the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine and Law, and Director, Division of Law, Ethics and Psychiatry at Columbia was previously A.F. Zeleznik Distinguished Professor and Chairman, Department of Psychiatry; and Director, Law and Psychiatry programme, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Appelbaum directs Columbia’s Centre for Research on Ethical, Legal & Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic and Behavioural Genetics. He is the author of many articles and books on law and ethics in clinical practice. Appelbaum is past President of the American Psychiatric Association, the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, and the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society, and has served as Chair of the Council on Psychiatry and Law for the American Psychiatric Association (APA).

He is currently Chair of APA’s Committee on Judicial Action and a member of the Standing Committee on Ethics or the World Psychiatric Association. He has received the Isaac Ray Award of the American Psychiatric Association for “outstanding contributions to forensic psychiatry and the psychiatric aspects of jurisprudence,” was the Fritz Redlich Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioural Sciences, and has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

Appelbaum performs forensic evaluations in civil and criminal cases, and treats patients with a broad variety of problems, including depression, anxiety, and adjustment problems.

Credits to Columbia University Medical Centre

Published: 16 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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Thomas Grisso

Thomas GrissoThomas Grisso is Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Psychology, and Director of the Law-Psychiatry programme at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. His research and teaching have focused on improving forensic evaluations for the courts and informing policy and law for youths in the juvenile justice system and for persons with mental disorders. Several of his fifteen books have been influential in setting standards for forensic mental health evaluations. He pioneered concepts on which forensic evaluations of several legal competencies have been developed, especially competence to stand trial and (with Paul Appelbaum) competence to consent to treatment. His contributions to juvenile justice policy and practice have included his studies of juveniles’ capacities to waive Miranda rights and their competence to stand trial, as well as development (with Richard Barnum) of a mental health screening tool now used statewide in juvenile detention and corrections in over 40 states.

Research performed with his colleagues in the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice was relied upon by the US Supreme Court in its recent decisions against the death penalty and limiting the sentence of life without parole for crimes committed during adolescence. His work has been recognised with awards from the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, the Royal College of Psychiatrists , the American Psychology-Law Society, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and the Chancellor’s Medal for Distinguished Scholarship (University of Massachusetts Medical School).

Credits to SelectedWorks

Published: 16 March 2014

Last update: 23 April 2015

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